Six Common Credit Score Myths

  1. Checking your credit hurts you. – When you apply for a new loan or credit card, the lender runs a credit inquiry. Too many of these inquiries in a short period can cause your score to dip. However, checking your own credit doesn’t damage your rating. In fact, many credit card companies allow account holders to view their FICO scores for free because regular monitoring is an effective way to spot fraudulent activity or identity theft.
  2. Your income level matters. – While your income certainly influences your ability to pay your debts, it doesn’t factor into your score. Credit reports may list your current and former employers, but that information holds no bearing on your score.
  3. Your education or occupation is important. – It doesn’t matter whether you went to an elite university, community college, or dropped out of high school. Your credit score measures your ability to manage debt, not your educational pedigree. Same goes for your job. Gainfully employed, under-employed, or unemployed, you can still build a good credit score.
  4. Closing a credit card will help your score. – Even if you pay off a credit card, closing the account can hurt you more than it helps. If you’re worried that you might misuse the credit, destroy the card—but keep the account open. The available credit and length of credit history will reflect positively and help you in the long run.
  5. Quick fixes can help bad credit. – Yes, it is possible to improve your credit score—but you don’t have to pay someone else to do it for you. Because most credit repair relies on sensible, strategic steps applied over time, you can handle it on your own. Rather than paying a credit repair service, use the money you save to bring past due balances up to date or pay down your overall debt.
  6. Avoiding all debt will help you keep a good credit score. – Your credit score is a metric that measures your ability to manage credit—not avoid it. If you don’t have any credit accounts, there’s nothing to measure. That being said, just because you qualify for credit doesn’t mean you have to max it out. You’ll help yourself more by using your credit strategically and paying off your balance each month.

While this list covers some of the most common credit score myths, there are countless others. By focusing on the facts and ignoring anything that doesn’t line up with them, you’ll find it easier to manage your credit with confidence.